Pinewood

American International School of Thessaloniki, Greece

Middle School Division

The  6th - 8th grade programs at Pinewood are designed to provide a smooth transfer from the elementary school years to increased academic intensity and expectations of the secondary school experience. In recognizing the many physical, social, and emotional challenges associated with early adolescence, processes are utilized which allow for student responsiveness to meet these myriad needs in a timely and efficient manner.  In so doing, the development of an environment conducive to learning within the academic rigors of the secondary school is advanced.

Supplies Lists for the Academic Year 2015-16

Courses Offered in the Middle School:

Grade 6

English Language Arts
With the development of a Middle School program, and the inclusion of the 6th grade as the first of three grades included in said program, students moving into the Middle School will begin to focus and develop the fundamentals that they have mastered from elementary school.  The structure of the curriculum is based around a tradition literature study course; thus, the use of literature, largely contemporary, will be used as the foundation of all learning in the course. Grammar, spelling, vocabulary, writing, and auditory based skills will germinate from the themes, subjects, and critical elements of the reading that is done in class.  The goal of the program is to begin to apply the various fundamentals of language into usable skills. 

Science
This course bridges elementary and secondary science by building on students’ knowledge in the areas of physics, chemistry, biology and earth science. Theoretical work will be consolidated with regular practical experiments and students will be encouraged to design their own experiments to test well known theories. The aim of the course is also to help students develop the skills required for success in science such as laboratory manipulative skills, critical thinking and scientific writing.  Each pupil will be provided with a copy of the text book Scott Foresman, Science 6 Diamond Edition. However supplementary information will be studied and it is therefore vital that pupils keep up to date with notes taken in class.

Math 6
In this course students will master the basic operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing with whole numbers, decimals and fractions.  They will learn how to apply these skills to solving word problems and for use in geometry, algebra, probability and statistics.  Students will cover mathematical topics including equation solving, ratios, proportions, percent, consumer math applications, as well as pre-geometry concepts concentrating on measurement and relationships involving lines, angles, and polygons. 
This course provides the essential groundwork for success in Pre Algebra.

French I
French I corresponds to the Level A1 (Breakthrough) of the Common Reference Levels established by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is in fact the lowest level of flanguage learning at the end of which students should be able to interact in a simple way, ask and answer simple questions, produce brief everyday expressions in areas of immediate practical need or on very familiar topics. To this aim, students will practise using basic sentence patterns and a limited repertoire of memorized phrases, groups of a few words and expressions sufficient for coping with simple survival needs. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of basic speaking and listening efficiency and high-frequency vocabulary structures of daily communicative situations.

French II
Corresponds to the  Level A2  of the Common Reference Levels established by the  Common European Framework of Reference for  Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is the level at which  emphasis is placed on social functions of language use. There is more active participation in conversation given some assistance and certain limitations, plus students train to sustain longer monologues. At the end of French II, students should have a repertoire of basic language enabling them to deal with specific everyday situations, involving familiar situations and topics. Pronunciation will be generally clear enough to be understood, possibly through repetitions, and despite a noticeable foreign accent.

Greek 1a
This course is an introduction to the study of the modern Greek language and its culture. It allows students to perform the most basic functions of the language and to become familiar with some elements of its culture. The emphasis is placed on the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing within the given context extending outside of the classroom setting when possible. The context focuses on the students’ lives and experiences and includes an exposure to everyday customs and lifestyles. Grammar is integrated throughout the course and is selected according to the language needs. A general introduction to the culture, its products (literature, laws, food, games), perspectives (attitudes, values, beliefs) and practices (patterns of social interaction) is integrated into the course. Students acquire some insight into how languages and cultures work by comparing the Greek language and culture to their own. Integration of other disciplines in on-going during the course.

Greek 2a
Students following this course have successfully completed Modern Greek 1a or a similar course. This course provides students with opportunities to continue the development of their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will participate in simple conversational situations both orally and in writing. They are able to satisfy basic survival needs and interact on issues of everyday life in the present and past tenses, inside and outside of the classroom setting. They will compose related sentences, which narrate, describe, compare and summarize familiar topics from the Greek culture. Focus is placed on understanding main ideas. Students will develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences of languages and will examine the influence of the beliefs and values on Greek culture.

Greek 3a
The final compulsory course broadens and deepens students’ Greek proficiency, introducing a greater variety of texts and topics as well as covering more complex grammar and expression. This course is the continuation of Modern Greek 2a and aims to develop students’ spoken expression particularly in debates and arguments, to introduce them to semi-specialized language (i.e., banking), to cover more challenging themes and to introduce non-native speakers to Greek literature. Degrees of comparison, the future perfect, comparatives and reflexive verbs are taught in detail along with texts on the history of Greek literature, Byzantine history, Greek life and food. Extracts, articles and sayings complete the range of subjects offered. This course is offered to students in Grade 7 who have attended 4-6 years of Greek in the primary school. Students can take the A2 level exams.

Host Country Studies
A course designed to introduce the history of Pinewood’s “Host” city to its students. Important historical events and aspects of art and culture dating from the 4th century BC when the city of Thessaloniki was founded to the present, will be introduced, examined and interpreted.

Social Studies
The sixth grade Social Studies course consists of three separate units of study.  Through the study of ancient civilizations students will explore the fundamentals of citizenship, the cultural importance of religion, the concept of social order, the significance of location, and the evolution of technology as civilizations become more sophisticated. Throughout the year students will be involved in geographical activities that coincide with the historical units and will engage in active learning activities in pairs or small groups. A strong educational emphasis is placed on oral and written communication and the mechanics of writing for history.

Physical Education
Physical Education at Pinewood is a course, which runs throughout a student’s career at the school. A variety of activities are presented and each student is provided a wide range of games, play, exercize and modified sports. It is structured to improve student’s motor fitness (agility, co ordination, flexibility, reaction time, speed and strength), to improve physical fitness (cardiovascular) and to improve skill level. Cross-references to other core content in the High School Physical Education objectives clearly demonstrate that students must be able to apply and use skills to be successful in their lives. Thinking critically about the importance of physical activity and the role it plays in individual, family and community health provides challenging, meaningful problem solving that goes beyond content-specific learning.

ICT
All middle school students attend IT classes twice a week. The courses are designed to introduce the students to the computer and some of its primary applications. Students will develop problem solving skills through the use of appropriate software, promote teamwork as a learning process, engage in meaningful first hand experiences in technology and develop and utilize critical thinking and decision making skills.
After completing the course, students will have a fundamental understanding of general programming and game development methods and procedures. The course will also introduce standard programming and game development terms that will serve as a foundation for future (and more advanced) programming and game development course work. Scratch was developed by the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and is used by Harvard University (among other universities) for their "Introduction To Computer Programming" course for incoming computer science majors.

*The Middle School IT courses are project based, depending on students’ prior IT knowledge.

English as a Second Language
Students in Middle School ESL 3/4 further develop their English language skills in the core areas of listening, reading, speaking and writing. Students read many kinds of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, as they continue to develop important reading skills such as finding main ideas, recognizing supporting evidence, and drawing conclusions based on information provided in the text. Additionally, students are given many opportunities to respond creatively to literary texts, in small group projects as well as individually done assignments, and to learn note-taking skills as they read and summarize several short non-fiction texts. Students also utilize texts studied in class to learn new vocabulary, review English sentence structure and recognize major patterns of written texts. Finally, students learn to write well organized paragraphs and short essays, and they plan and deliver frequent oral presentations on a number of topics, both personal and academic. All written assignments must be turned in as a printed paper copy; I do not accept electronic copies of homework sent as e-mail attachments, common or shared documents, etc.

Music
Music is the study and exploration of sound and the expressive use of musical elements through the singing of songs and the playing of instruments. Students will join together in musical activities, using their voices and instruments to develop concepts about different musical elements. They will continue to develop an awareness and appreciation of music from different cultures. Students will participate in activities which include listening to musical examples, creating and playing music on classroom instruments. This course offers students a theoretical and historical background of music and hands-on experience learning how to sing and how to play some basic instruments. Music styles and eras to be studied during the course include Classical music form Gregorian chant till avant-garde of 20th century as well as Jazz, Rock and Roll and traditional music.

Grade 7

English Language Arts
Grade 7 is largely a continuation of the skill growth that began for the students as they completed the  6th grade language arts course.  7th grade continues the literature based curriculum and looks to broaden the students appreciation for language use and critical abilities as they pertain to language applications.  As the students' reading knowledge broadens, so too will their writing capabilities.  Much of the writing program in 7th grade will be devoted to the students ability to complete longer and more complete writing assignments that require a finer understanding of the English language.  Students will complete a fair amount of research and critical writing throughout the year; therefore, a large amount of non-fiction reading and writing will accompany the themes and subjects that are introduced by the literature that is read in class.  Grammar, spelling, and auditory skills will naturally follow as the students will learn, and be expected to use, a larger variety of words.  In order to encourage this lexicon growth, students will regularly complete assignments that focus their attention to the words in which they come into contact.

Pre-Algebra
In addition to reinforcing the concepts presented in Math 6, this course extends problem solving to a more sophisticated level. Students apply integer operations to various units of study and concentrate on building an understanding of the core concepts and skills of Algebra. This course provides students with the essential tools for success in Algebra I.

Social Studies 7
The Social Studies course for seventh grade students explores the legacy of the civilizations of the Medieval World in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas.  Students explore the patterns in which civilizations change over time in response to improvements in technology, education, trade networks, or through contact with other cultures. A progression through these historical periods provides the perfect vehicle for the exploration of multiple social studies disciplines including religion, citizenship, politics, economics, geography, and history.  This course serves as a link to future studies in European exploration and conquest.
Throughout the year students will be involved in basic geographical activities that coincide with the historical units and will engage in active learning activities in pairs or small groups. A strong educational emphasis is placed on oral and written communication and the mechanics of writing for history.

Science 7
The Science 7 curriculum focuses on life science, including ecology. Science concepts and principles place emphasis on the nature of science and inquiry. The course builds upon students’ experiences in life and helps students recognize and appreciate the application of science to everyday living. It presents a scientific study of the structure and function of living organisms; it promotes an awareness of living things and underlines the processes that support life and the relationship among organisms. It investigates human interference in natural ecosystems as well as the composition and processes in the atmosphere. Throughout the course, students construct an understanding of science concepts through systems and diversity. Each student conducts a science fair project in order to develop scientific research skills. The course provides the foundation for further studies in high school biology.

Physical Education
Physical Education at Pinewood is a course, which runs throughout a student’s career at the school. A variety of activities are presented and each student is provided a wide range of games, play, exercize and modified sports. It is structured to improve student’s motor fitness (agility, co ordination, flexibility, reaction time, speed and strength), to improve physical fitness (cardiovascular) and to improve skill level. Cross-references to other core content in the High School Physical Education objectives clearly demonstrate that students must be able to apply and use skills to be successful in their lives. Thinking critically about the importance of physical activity and the role it plays in individual, family and community health provides challenging, meaningful problem solving that goes beyond content-specific learning.

ICT
All middle school students attend IT classes twice a week. The courses are designed to introduce the students to the computer and some of its primary applications. Students will develop problem solving skills through the use of appropriate software, promote teamwork as a learning process, engage in meaningful first hand experiences in technology and develop and utilize critical thinking and decision making skills.
After completing the course, students will have a fundamental understanding of general programming and game development methods and procedures. The course will also introduce standard programming and game development terms that will serve as a foundation for future (and more advanced) programming and game development course work. Scratch was developed by the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and is used by Harvard University (among other universities) for their "Introduction To Computer Programming" course for incoming computer science majors.

*The Middle School IT courses are project based, depending on students’ prior IT knowledge.

Host Country Studies
A course designed to introduce the history of Pinewood’s “Host” city to its students. Important historical events and aspects of art and culture dating from the 4th century BC when the city of Thessaloniki was founded to the present, will be introduced, examined and interpreted.

Greek 1a
This course is an introduction to the study of the modern Greek language and its culture. It allows students to perform the most basic functions of the language and to become familiar with some elements of its culture. The emphasis is placed on the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing within the given context extending outside of the classroom setting when possible. The context focuses on the students’ lives and experiences and includes an exposure to everyday customs and lifestyles. Grammar is integrated throughout the course and is selected according to the language needs. A general introduction to the culture, its products (literature, laws, food, games), perspectives (attitudes, values, beliefs) and practices (patterns of social interaction) is integrated into the course. Students acquire some insight into how languages and cultures work by comparing the Greek language and culture to their own. Integration of other disciplines in on-going during the course.

Greek 2a
Students following this course have successfully completed Modern Greek 1a or a similar course. This course provides students with opportunities to continue the development of their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will participate in simple conversational situations both orally and in writing. They are able to satisfy basic survival needs and interact on issues of everyday life in the present and past tenses, inside and outside of the classroom setting. They will compose related sentences, which narrate, describe, compare and summarize familiar topics from the Greek culture. Focus is placed on understanding main ideas. Students will develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences of languages and will examine the influence of the beliefs and values on Greek culture.

Greek 3a
The final compulsory course broadens and deepens students’ Greek proficiency, introducing a greater variety of texts and topics as well as covering more complex grammar and expression. This course is the continuation of Modern Greek 2a and aims to develop students’ spoken expression particularly in debates and arguments, to introduce them to semi-specialized language (i.e., banking), to cover more challenging themes and to introduce non-native speakers to Greek literature. Degrees of comparison, the future perfect, comparatives and reflexive verbs are taught in detail along with texts on the history of Greek literature, Byzantine history, Greek life and food. Extracts, articles and sayings complete the range of subjects offered. This course is offered to students in Grade 7 who have attended 4-6 years of Greek in the primary school. Students can take the A2 level exams.

French I
French I corresponds to the Level A1 (Breakthrough) of the Common Reference Levels established by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is in fact the lowest level of language learning at the end of which students should be able to interact in a simple way, ask and answer simple questions, produce brief everyday expressions in areas of immediate practical need or on very familiar topics. To this aim, students will practice using basic sentence patterns and a limited repertoire of memorized phrases, groups of a few words and expressions sufficient for coping with simple survival needs. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of basic speaking and listening efficiency and high-frequency vocabulary structures of daily communicative situations.

French II
Corresponds to the  Level A2  of the Common Reference Levels established by the  Common European Framework of Reference for  Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is the level at which  emphasis is placed on social functions of language use. There is more active participation in conversation given some assistance and certain limitations, plus students train to sustain longer monologues. At the end of French II, students should have a repertoire of basic language enabling them to deal with specific everyday situations, involving familiar situations and topics. Pronunciation will be generally clear enough to be understood, possibly through repetitions, and despite a noticeable foreign accent.

English as a Second Language
Students in Middle School ESL 3/4 further develop their English language skills in the core areas of listening, reading, speaking and writing. Students read many kinds of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, as they continue to develop important reading skills such as finding main ideas, recognizing supporting evidence, and drawing conclusions based on information provided in the text. Additionally, students are given many opportunities to respond creatively to literary texts, in small group projects as well as individually done assignments, and to learn note-taking skills as they read and summarize several short non-fiction texts. Students also utilize texts studied in class to learn new vocabulary, review English sentence structure and recognize major patterns of written texts. Finally, students learn to write well organized paragraphs and short essays, and they plan and deliver frequent oral presentations on a number of topics, both personal and academic. All written assignments must be turned in as a printed paper copy; I do not accept electronic copies of homework sent as e-mail attachments, common or shared documents, etc.

Visual Arts
This course introduces students to the Elements of  Design. The main focus is to teach students in theory and praxis about the elements of design. They will gain knowledge and skills about line, shape, form, value, color, space, and texture.

Grade 8

English Language Arts
As the final year of the Middle School program, 8th grade students will spend much of the year refining and mastering the skills that they have learned thus far. This process is necessary in order to ease the stress and high expectations of the Secondary/High School program.  Students will be broadening their vocabulary, solidifying their critical and creative writing skills, and developing a voice for their maturing individuality. Expression will be a large theme throughout the year and students will work to develop their abilities of communication and idea development. A great deal of stress will be put on creating thoughtful, clear, and concise written pieces in order for students to effectively communicate their thoughts and ideas.  The literary based curriculum will continue in 8th grade, and students will have the opportunity to read both contemporary and classic literature with the hope of facilitating a further appreciation of reading, writing, and the art of language use.  By the end of the course students will have the skills and knowledge necessary to excel in both learning and personal environments.

Algebra I
Algebra I is a traditional one-year course in modern Algebra and it is the first course in the college preparatory sequence.  It is intended to stress the modern concepts and structure of first year Algebra and encourage the student to use precise language and deductive reasoning. The goal of this course is to teach the basic concepts and skills in Algebra, which are fundamental to future understanding in Math and Science.  Areas of study include: properties, problem solving, polynomials, factoring polynomials, algebraic fractions, linear equations and systems and inequalities. 
This course provides the necessary tools for success in Geometry and Algebra II.

Social Studies
This course studies the Earth and its people and will help students understand how people, places, and the environments came to be and how they affect each other. Students will examine the physical geography of the earth as well as the human geography, or the study of people as they have spread across the Earth. Each unit of study focuses on a geographic region and begins with an in-depth thematic map study of the environment.   What follows are specific regional case studies which delve into geographic topics such as the ecosystem, trade, migration, settlement, and other human activities that change the environment. The overriding goals of this course are for the student to recognize the importance of geography in the history of the past, the present and in planning for the future as well as understanding the influence that the physical environment has on people and societies and vice versa.

Science
This course is a basic introduction to Physical Science. It is designed to create an atmosphere of discovery in concept development. It is believed that a conceptual scheme provides a framework within which students will participate in the processes of Physical Science and understand the workings of the physical world. The spirit of inquiry is promoted through class participation, discussion and hands-on work. Topics covered include but are not limited to: atoms, elements and the periodic table, states of matter, properties and changes of matter, motion and momentum, force and Newton’s Laws, work, energy and simple machines. In addition, students conduct a science fair project in order to further develop their scientific research skills.   The course provides the fundamental bases for the field of Physical Science (physics and chemistry) necessary in advanced science courses.

Greek 1a
This course is an introduction to the study of the modern Greek language and its culture. It allows students to perform the most basic functions of the language and to become familiar with some elements of its culture. The emphasis is placed on the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing within the given context extending outside of the classroom setting when possible. The context focuses on the students’ lives and experiences and includes an exposure to everyday customs and lifestyles. Grammar is integrated throughout the course and is selected according to the language needs. A general introduction to the culture, its products (literature, laws, food, games), perspectives (attitudes, values, beliefs) and practices (patterns of social interaction) is integrated into the course. Students acquire some insight into how languages and cultures work by comparing the Greek language and culture to their own. Integration of other disciplines in on-going during the course.

Greek 2a
Students following this course have successfully completed Modern Greek 1a or a similar course. This course provides students with opportunities to continue the development of their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will participate in simple conversational situations both orally and in writing. They are able to satisfy basic survival needs and interact on issues of everyday life in the present and past tenses, inside and outside of the classroom setting. They will compose related sentences, which narrate, describe, compare and summarize familiar topics from the Greek culture. Focus is placed on understanding main ideas. Students will develop a better understanding of the similarities and differences of languages and will examine the influence of the beliefs and values on Greek culture.

Greek 3a
The final compulsory course broadens and deepens students’ Greek proficiency, introducing a greater variety of texts and topics as well as covering more complex grammar and expression. This course is the continuation of Modern Greek 2a and aims to develop students’ spoken expression particularly in debates and arguments, to introduce them to semi-specialized language (i.e., banking), to cover more challenging themes and to introduce non-native speakers to Greek literature. Degrees of comparison, the future perfect, comparatives and reflexive verbs are taught in detail along with texts on the history of Greek literature, Byzantine history, Greek life and food. Extracts, articles and sayings complete the range of subjects offered. This course is offered to students in Grade 7 who have attended 4-6 years of Greek in the primary school. Students can take the A2 level exams.

Greek 4
This program is offered to students whose mother tongue is Greek or are bilingual in Greek and English and follow closely the Modern Greek program, but is specifically adapted to the needs of Pinewood students. Students are taught  the Greek Language with the objective of improving their spoken and written language skills. Students engage in the reading and analysis of short literature extracts as well as the study of complete books. At the same time in order to further understanding of Greek culture, emphasis is also placed on elements of Greek history, geography and culture as well as participation in national celebrations.

French I
French I corresponds to the Level A1 (Breakthrough) of the Common Reference Levels established by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is in fact the lowest level of language learning at the end of which students should be able to interact in a simple way, ask and answer simple questions, produce brief everyday expressions in areas of immediate practical need or on very familiar topics. To this aim, students will practice using basic sentence patterns and a limited repertoire of memorized phrases, groups of a few words and expressions sufficient for coping with simple survival needs. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of basic speaking and listening efficiency and high-frequency vocabulary structures of daily communicative situations.

French II
Corresponds to the  Level A2  of the Common Reference Levels established by the  Common European Framework of Reference for  Languages (Council of Europe, 2001). It is the level at which  emphasis is placed on social functions of language use. There is more active participation in conversation given some assistance and certain limitations, plus students train to sustain longer monologues. At the end of French II, students should have a repertoire of basic language enabling them to deal with specific everyday situations, involving familiar situations and topics. Pronunciation will be generally clear enough to be understood, possibly through repetitions, and despite a noticeable foreign accent.

Physical Education
Physical Education at Pinewood is a course, which runs throughout a student’s career at the school. A variety of activities are presented and each student is provided a wide range of games, play, exercize and modified sports. It is structured to improve student’s motor fitness (agility, co ordination, flexibility, reaction time, speed and strength), to improve physical fitness (cardiovascular) and to improve skill level. Cross-references to other core content in the High School Physical Education objectives clearly demonstrate that students must be able to apply and use skills to be successful in their lives. Thinking critically about the importance of physical activity and the role it plays in individual, family and community health provides challenging, meaningful problem solving that goes beyond content-specific learning.

ICT
All middle school students attend IT classes twice a week. The courses are designed to introduce the students to the computer and some of its primary applications. Students will develop problem solving skills through the use of appropriate software, promote teamwork as a learning process, engage in meaningful first hand experiences in technology and develop and utilize critical thinking and decision making skills.
After completing the course, students will have a fundamental understanding of general programming and game development methods and procedures. The course will also introduce standard programming and game development terms that will serve as a foundation for future (and more advanced) programming and game development course work. Scratch was developed by the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and is used by Harvard University (among other universities) for their "Introduction To Computer Programming" course for incoming computer science majors.

*The Middle School IT courses are project based, depending on students’ prior IT knowledge.

Host Country Studies
A course designed to introduce the history of Pinewood’s “Host” city to its students. Important historical events and aspects of art and culture dating from the 4th century BC when the city of Thessaloniki was founded to the present, will be introduced, examined and interpreted.

English as a Second Language
Students in Middle School ESL 3/4 further develop their English language skills in the core areas of listening, reading, speaking and writing. Students read many kinds of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, as they continue to develop important reading skills such as finding main ideas, recognizing supporting evidence, and drawing conclusions based on information provided in the text. Additionally, students are given many opportunities to respond creatively to literary texts, in small group projects as well as individually done assignments, and to learn note-taking skills as they read and summarize several short non-fiction texts. Students also utilize texts studied in class to learn new vocabulary, review English sentence structure and recognize major patterns of written texts. Finally, students learn to write well organized paragraphs and short essays, and they plan and deliver frequent oral presentations on a number of topics, both personal and academic. All written assignments must be turned in as a printed paper copy; I do not accept electronic copies of homework sent as e-mail attachments, common or shared documents, etc.

Visual Arts
This course introduces students to the Elements of  Design. The main focus is to teach students in theory and praxis about the elements of design. They will gain knowledge and skills about line, shape, form, value, color, space, and texture.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is fundamental to the integrity and operation of our school. Acts of academic dishonesty, including plagiarism (the act of presenting others’ words and ideas as one’s own without crediting the source), stealing in quizzes and tests, copying work from other students or allowing their own work to be copied, or using notes during a test, are considered serious offenses. The consequences of academic dishonesty will be a zero grade on the specific test/assignment, and additional disciplinary action. The said student will be ineligible or removed from the National Honor Society.